The Citizen Scholars in Context

The class on the 26th of September had a very inspiring topic (which lead me to day-dreaming about implementing a crowdsourcing system in my hometown sometime in the future).

Citizen Science is, according to Wikipedia, “a scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by amateur or nonprofessional scientists,” or simply put “public participation in scientific research.” The citizen scholars are, thus, any person who takes part in the research and contributes to the progress of it. An example of such project is Zooniverse, where people are invited to help recognize and classify faces of animals that would further contribute to the development of an AI feature that computers will use in recognizing those faces automatically.

In class, not only that we discussed about the benefits of such a mechanism, but we even tried it ourselves! Crowdtranscription is a subcategory of Crowdsourcing which requires the user’s help with recognizing and transcribing text in scanned images. Me and my classmates, together with our professor, went to 18thConnect and edited the Memoir of a chart of the east coast of Arabia from Dofar to the Island Maziera. The document had been previously digitized by an OCR program, but as we learned last time, the digitization of a text comes with occasional errors which, so far, only a human brain can correct. It was an amazing activity for me as I could take responsibility and contribute to other people’s attempts to create great online resources for the large public. At the same time, I was able to notice, as last time, other errors that appear in the process of text digitization  and also what decisions one editor needs to make when transcribing and/ or editing a text. For example, he or she needs to decide whether to preserve the italics, size, indentations, or superscripts that appear in a text, or simply to replace them and motivate their decisions in a note.

Since the text was documenting the journey of a sailor around the Arabian coasts, a thought popped up in my mind. I realized I know very little about the old history of the geographical area I am currently living in (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirate). Then I realized there are an incredible number of research that can be conducted using citizen science. The UAE and the Arab World in general is still so little known to those outside of it, especially when it comes to fields such as history, language, literature, culture, and even (old or traditional) cuisine (if you are to ask me). A research on almost anything in these categories would contribute to the dissemination of information beyond the Arab borders, out into the curious and intrigued world. After a quick search on Google I found that there are some projects (currently undergoing or already finished) on the topic. For example, the team behind the Arabic language collection claims that their collection comprises more than 100,000 books and more than 15,000 manuscripts. Still, very little of this is available online, to the large public, and, which is more, even fewer must have been translated to English. However, good news are announced, as some of the manuscripts are going through the process of digitization.

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